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Few could have failed to notice the recent sensational decision of the Supreme Court which declared that Employment Tribunal fees are unlawful. 


The Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) has decided in the case of Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council v Willets and others  that voluntary overtime must be taken into account in the calculation of holiday pay under the Working Time Regulations  1998 (WTR) because it forms part of “normal remuneration”  which must be paid during periods of annual leave.


There have been two appellate level court decisions regarding pension benefits this month which will be of interest to employers. The first deals with what amounts to “unfavourable” treatment for the purpose of a claim for discrimination in respect of something arising in consequence of a disability.  The second concerns pension schemes who have not equalised benefits for same-sex spouses following the civil partnership and same-sex marriage acts.

Matthew Taylor’s long-awaited independent review of modern employment practices was launched yesterday.

To date solicitors have been restricted in the types of fee arrangement that can be offered to clients. For example, solicitors have been unable to charge a fee based on the percentage of sums awarded in a litigation.


It has now been over a year since the UK voted to leave the European Union, but it has taken until this week for there to be any clarity on what the UK government proposes with regard to the over 3 million EU citizens who currently live and work in the UK.  The government has been accused of using these EU nationals as “bargaining chips” in the Brexit negotiations, and although there is now a little more detail, there has been criticism that the proposals do not go far enough.

Section 15 of The Equality Act 2010, provides that it will be unlawful discrimination for a disabled person to be treated unfavourably because of something arising in consequence of their disability unless it can be proven that the treatment is a proportionate means of achieving a legitimate aim.  The question of how to approach the fundamental issue of causation inherent in the statutory test is one that can throw up fairly complex and profound issues that even experts in metaphysics might struggle with.

Many people are reluctant to put in place a Will.  Some feel they are too young and do not wish to consider making a Will until later in life or they become seriously ill.  Others feel they have insufficient assets or are comfortable that their family will follow their instructions.   Regardless of your age or how modest or straightforward you think your estate is, we recommend all our clients put Wills in place.

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