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The issue of whether a worker is to be regarded as carrying out “time work” and therefore entitled to the National Minimum wage  (“NMW”) for the full duration of their shift (even if they may be sleeping during this time) requires multiple factors to  be  taken into account.   If the worker is not carrying out such “time work” and is merely to be regarded as “available and required to be available … for the purposes of working”, then they will only be entitled to the NMW in relation to time when they are awake for the purpose of carrying out relevant duties.

“Intelligence is about being open minded”, the late, great Irish sports writer Con Houlihan once said.

Figures released this week by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) show the average working week in the UK continues to rise.

New requirements have come into effect which will have application for many of the major commercial disputes litigated here in Scotland. These requirements aim to nudge parties away from the Court and towards Alternative Dispute Resolution (“ADR”) or settlement. Below is set out a summary of the changes and what their effect may be for those parties engaged in a commercial dispute.

Today, Thursday (6 April 2017), the new ‘apprenticeship levy’ will come into force.The levy, which was introduced by sections 98 to 121 of the Finance Act 2016, will be potentially applicable to all UK employers and will go towards the cost of apprenticeship training.

While non-domiciled individuals (“non-doms”) have traditionally received favourable tax treatment in the UK, a number of reforms were announced in the 2015 summer Budget to widen the scope of the UK tax net.  Last week’s Finance Bill contains a number of provisions which bring these changes into force from 6 April 2017.

We are almost one quarter of the way through 2017 (already?!). Each year the beginning of April is notable from an employment law perspective, with a number of changes usually coming into force. This year is no different and so this week we take a look at some of the key changes coming next month.

It has long been the case that human activities produce large amounts of records of what has happened and of what people have said and done. Now that so much of what people do and say is done through connected electronic devices, and so much of what happens is monitored electronically, more and more data is produced, and it is easier than ever to gather very large amounts of that data. This is further facilitated by the availability and cost of storage capacity. Taken together with the availability and cost of computing power, it is easier than ever to store and process huge volumes of data.

Chambers UK 2018

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