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As has been widely reported in the press this week, the Young Women’s Trust has released the results of their annual survey, which noted that, 100 years on from when the first women got the vote in the UK, there is still widespread inequality for young women. The survey, which questioned a representative sample of 18 – 30 year olds in England and Wales, found in particular:

This month, the Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS) launched new guidance on employee references, an area which employers are often apprehensive about. In a previous Insight post, we discussed the potential GDPR (i.e. data protection) issues which can arise in relation to references.  The ACAS guidance is a useful summary for employers regarding some of their other obligations in relation to the provision of references and the potential risks arising in preparing and providing these.

The plight of the over-burdened “always on” British worker feverishly checking emails on their long commute home and struggling with incipient mental illness has recently been highlighted by certain international comparisons. These demonstrate a marked contrast in the legal regimes applicable to workers in other countries in relation to the regulation of working hours and the positive duty on employers to ensure that their employees do not work excessive hours.

Insurance firm Aviva produced a report this week finding that in the UK, 6.4 million over-50s workers were planning to retire later than they expected compared to 10 years ago. The report found that this was due to the rising cost of living and insufficient pension savings. Government research predicts that by the mid-2030s half of all adults in the UK will be over 50 years of age. By 2025 there will be 300,000 fewer UK-born under 30s. This development combined with the UK’s proposed departure from the EU resulting in fewer EU workers arriving means that there is likely to be a huge increase in necessary reliance on older workers within the UK economy. Aviva are accordingly urging businesses to “increase their commitment to older employees and help them adapt to a longer working life.”

The Equality Act 2010 prohibits discrimination and harassment on the grounds of nine “protected characteristics”, one of which is religion or belief. While it is relatively straightforward to identify religions and religious beliefs that are granted protection under the act, courts have grappled in recent years with what types of philosophical beliefs should be protected.

Recent publicity around the Supreme Court’s refusal to grant a divorce to a woman, who claimed to be ‘trapped in a loveless marriage’ to her husband of 40 years, has highlighted the differences in divorce law in England and Wales, compared with Scotland.                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

STEP Journal July 2018

Jaclyn Russell and Magnus Mackay survey the landscape of succession law and cohabitants' rights in Scotland and discuss the potential for reform.

As published within the STEP Journal 

Magnus Mackay and Jaclyn Russell survey the landscape of succession law and cohabitant’s rights in Scotland and discuss the potential for reform

The succession rights of married and unmarried couples were brought into sharp focus last year when the Court of Appeal in England and Wales handed down its judgement in the case of Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust & Others v Jacqueline Smith [2017] EWCA Civ 1916. With the Scottish Government considering significant reform of succession law, the present arrangements, proposals for change and the potential impact of the case are of significant interest to Scottish practitioners.

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